Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
   

Newsletters


The newsletter articles on this page provide valuable information on timely and interesting financial issues across a variety of subject areas, including retirement, investments, personal finance, annuities, insurance, taxes, college, and government benefits.


   
Quiz: Financial Facts That Might Surprise You
Going Public: An IPO's Market Debut May Not Live Up to the Hype
Protect Your Heirs by Naming a Trust as IRA Beneficiary
I received a large refund on my tax return this year. Should I adjust my withholding?
What is the difference between a tax deduction and a tax credit?


SIGN UP NOW
Enter your name and e-mail to receive e-mail updates from me.
NAME:
E-MAIL:


 
 

I received a large refund on my tax return this year. Should I adjust my withholding?

You must have been pleasantly surprised to find out you'd be getting a refund from the IRS — especially if it was a large sum. And while you may have considered this type of windfall a stroke of good fortune, is it really?

The IRS issued over 112 million federal income tax refunds, averaging $2,895, for tax year 2016.1 You probably wouldn't pay someone $240 each month in order to receive $2,900 back, without interest, at the end of a year. But that's essentially what a tax refund is — a short-term loan to the government.

Because you received a large refund on your tax return this year, you may want to reevaluate your federal income tax withholding. That way you could end up taking home more of your pay and putting it to good use.

When determining the correct withholding amount, your objective is to have just enough withheld to prevent you from having to owe a large amount of money or scramble for cash at tax time next year, or from owing a penalty for having too little withheld.

It's generally a good idea to check your withholding periodically. This is particularly important when something changes in your life; for example, if you get married, divorced, or have a child; you or your spouse change jobs; or your financial situation changes significantly.

Furthermore, the implementation of the new tax law at the beginning of 2018 means your withholding could be off more than it might be in a typical year. Employers withhold taxes from paychecks based on W-4 information and IRS withholding tables. The IRS released 2018 calculation tables reflecting the new rates and rules earlier this year. Even so, the old W-4 and worksheet you previously gave to your employer reflect deductions and credits that have changed or been eliminated under the new tax law.

The IRS has revised a useful online withholding calculator that can help you determine the appropriate amount of withholding. You still need to complete and submit a new W-4 to your employer to make any adjustments. Visit irs.gov for more information.

1Internal Revenue Service, 2018
 
©2018 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Tell A Friend Tell A Friend
Connect with us on: Go to RSS Feed  Go to LinkedIn  Go to Facebook  Go to Twitter  Go to Google+  Go to YouTube Channel  Go to Blog  
 
 
 
Money Concepts International Inc. ©1979-2010
11440 North Jog Road,
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
Disclosures  |  Terms & Conditions
Investments are not FDIC or NCUA Insured May Lose Value -
No Bank or Credit Union Guarantee
All Securities Through
Money Concepts Capital Corp.
Phone: (561) 472-2000
Member FINRA / SIPC
 


Check the background of this financial professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.